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Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 Apr;38(4):1965-1976. doi: 10.1002/hbm.23497. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Epicenters of dynamic connectivity in the adaptation of the ventral visual system.

Author information

1
Center of Neuroimmunology, Institut d'Investigacions Biomedica August Pi Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain.
2
Gordon Center For Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Population Health Sciences, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Bonn, Germany.
5
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, California.
6
Department of Neurology, Centre for Alzheimer Research and Treatment, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN:

Neuronal responses adapt to familiar and repeated sensory stimuli. Enhanced synchrony across wide brain systems has been postulated as a potential mechanism for this adaptation phenomenon. Here, we used recently developed graph theory methods to investigate hidden connectivity features of dynamic synchrony changes during a visual repetition paradigm. Particularly, we focused on strength connectivity changes occurring at local and distant brain neighborhoods.

PRINCIPAL OBSERVATIONS:

We found that connectivity reorganization in visual modal cortex-such as local suppressed connectivity in primary visual areas and distant suppressed connectivity in fusiform areas-is accompanied by enhanced local and distant connectivity in higher cognitive processing areas in multimodal and association cortex. Moreover, we found a shift of the dynamic functional connections from primary-visual-fusiform to primary-multimodal/association cortex.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that repetition-suppression is made possible by reorganization of functional connectivity that enables communication between low- and high-order areas. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1965-1976, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

adaptation; dynamic connectivity; face processing; graph theory; multimodal integration; repetition suppression; visual system

PMID:
28029725
PMCID:
PMC5342908
DOI:
10.1002/hbm.23497
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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