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Environ Entomol. 2016 Dec;45(6):1505-1514. doi: 10.1093/ee/nvw141. Epub 2016 Oct 22.

Spatial Distribution and Coexisting Patterns of Adults and Nymphs of Tibraca limbativentris (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Paddy Rice Fields.

[Article in English, Portuguese; Abstract available in Portuguese from the publisher]

Author information

1
Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, 1980 Folwell Ave., Saint Paul, MN 55108 (alves011@umn.edu).
2
Laboratório de Entomologia, Embrapa Arroz e Feijão, Rodovia GO-462, Km 12 Zona Rural - C.P. 179, Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO, Brasil, CEP 75375-000, Brasil (jose.barrigossi@embrapa.br).
3
Laboratório de Geotecnologias e Métodos Quantitativos, Embrapa Meio Ambiente, Rodovia SP-340, Km 127 - C.P. 69, Jaguariúna, SP, Brasil, CEP 13820-000, Brasil (aline.maia@embrapa.br).
4
Laboratório de Entomologia, Embrapa Arroz e Feijão, Rodovia GO-462, Km 12 Zona Rural - C.P. 179, Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO, Brasil, CEP 75375-000, Brasil (jose.barrigossi@embrapa.br) jose.barrigossi@embrapa.br.

Abstract

in English, Portuguese

The rice stem stink bug, Tibraca limbativentris Stål (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is a primary insect pest of paddy rice in South America. Knowledge of its spatial distribution can support sampling plans needed for timely decisions about pest control. This study aimed to investigate the spatial distribution of adults and nymphs of T. limbativentris and determine the spatial coexistence of these stages of development. Fifteen paddy rice fields were scouted once each season to estimate insect densities. Scouting was performed on regular grids with sampling points separated by ∼50 m. Moran's I and semivariograms were used to determine spatial distribution patterns. Spatial coexistence of nymphs and adults was explored via spatial point process. Here, adults and nymphs had typically contrasting spatial distribution patterns within the same field; however, the frequency of aggregation was not different between these developmental stages. Adults and nymphs were aggregated in seven fields and randomly distributed in the other eight fields. Uniform distribution of adults or nymphs was not observed. The study-wide semivariogram ranges were ∼40 m for adults and ∼55 m for nymphs. Nymphs and adults spatially coexisted on 67% of the fields. Coexisting patterns were classified using one of the following processes: stage-independent, bidirectional attractive, unidirectional attractive, bidirectional inhibiting, or unidirectional inhibiting. The information presented herein can be important for developing sampling plans for decision-making, implementing tactics for site-specific management, and monitoring areas free of T. limbativentris.

KEYWORDS:

GIS; Oryza sativa; kriging; large-scale variability; negative binomial regression

PMID:
28028098
DOI:
10.1093/ee/nvw141
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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