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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017 Apr;49(4):275-284.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2016.11.002. Epub 2016 Dec 24.

Culture and Diet Among Chinese American Children Aged 9-13 Years: A Qualitative Study.

Author information

1
US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Health Disparities Research, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Electronic address: CSYeung@mdanderson.org.
2
Department of Health Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA.
3
US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.
4
Office of Planning, Evaluation and Research for Effectiveness, Houston Health Department, Houston, TX.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine Chinese American children's behaviors, food preferences, and cultural influences on their diet.

DESIGN:

Qualitative individual interviews using constructs from the proposed model of dietary acculturation.

SETTING:

Community centers and Chinese schools in Houston, TX.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-five Chinese American children aged 9-13 years.

PHENOMENON OF INTEREST:

Diet, favorite restaurants, and parents' cooking and grocery shopping habits.

ANALYSIS:

Content analysis and thematic data analysis to identify code categories and themes. Coders also identified patterns based on demographic and acculturation factors.

RESULTS:

Overall, participants described their diets and associated behaviors as Asian and non-Asian. Key themes included preference for Asian and non-Asian foods; consumption of non-Asian foods for breakfast and lunch, but Asian foods for dinner; infrequent dining at restaurants; grocery shopping at Asian and non-Asian stores; and familial influences on diet. Acculturated children and children of higher socioeconomic status appeared to prefer and consume a more Westernized/non-Asian diet.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Results illustrate that Chinese American children in this study practiced both Asian and non-Asian dietary behaviors. Findings corroborated existing acculturation research with parents and caregivers; supported constructs in the model of dietary acculturation; and provide guidance for research and programs related to dietary behaviors, determinants, and culture among this population.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese; acculturation; children; culture; diet; food preferences; interviews

PMID:
28027858
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2016.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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