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Ageing Res Rev. 2017 May;35:87-111. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2016.12.002. Epub 2016 Dec 23.

Biomarkers associated with sedentary behaviour in older adults: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Agaplesion Bethesda Hospital, Geriatric Medicine Ulm University, Ulm, Germany; Geriatric Center Ulm/Alb-Donau, Ulm, Germany; Department of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany. Electronic address: katharina.wirth@bethesda-ulm.de.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany; Department of Clinical Gerontology, Robert-Bosch-Hospital, Stuttgart, Germany.
3
Agaplesion Bethesda Hospital, Geriatric Medicine Ulm University, Ulm, Germany; Geriatric Center Ulm/Alb-Donau, Ulm, Germany.
4
Agaplesion Bethesda Hospital, Geriatric Medicine Ulm University, Ulm, Germany; Geriatric Center Ulm/Alb-Donau, Ulm, Germany; Department of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany.
5
Fundació Salut i Envelliment - Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Biomedical Research Institute Sant Pau (IIB-Sant Pau), Barcelona, Spain.
6
UKCRC Centre of Excellence for Public Health (NI), Centre for Public Health, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom.
7
Faculty of Psychology, Education and Sport Sciences Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain.
8
Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Muscle Research Cluster (SMRC), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences (LPES), Bethesda, MD, USA.
9
Department of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany.
10
Physiotherapy Department, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AZ, United Kingdom; Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London, Box SE5 8AF, United Kingdom; Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Pathomechanisms of sedentary behaviour (SB) are unclear. We conducted a systematic review to investigate the associations between SB and various biomarkers in older adults.

METHODS:

Electronic databases were searched (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED) up to July 2015 to identify studies with objective or subjective measures of SB, sample size ≥50, mean age ≥60years and accelerometer wear time ≥3days. Methodological quality was appraised with the CASP tool. The protocol was pre-specified (PROSPERO CRD42015023731).

RESULTS:

12701 abstracts were retrieved, 275 full text articles further explored, from which 249 were excluded. In the final sample (26 articles) a total of 63 biomarkers were detected. Most investigated markers were: body mass index (BMI, n=15), waist circumference (WC, n=15), blood pressure (n=11), triglycerides (n=12) and high density lipoprotein (HDL, n=15). Some inflammation markers were identified such as interleukin-6, C-reactive protein or tumor necrosis factor alpha. There was a lack of renal, muscle or bone biomarkers. Randomized controlled trials found a positive correlation for SB with BMI, neck circumference, fat mass, HbA1C, cholesterol and insulin levels, cohort studies additionally for WC, leptin, C-peptide, ApoA1 and Low density lipoprotein and a negative correlation for HDL.

CONCLUSION:

Most studied biomarkers associated with SB were of cardiovascular or metabolic origin. There is a suggestion of a negative impact of SB on biomarkers but still a paucity of high quality investigations exist. Longitudinal studies with objectively measured SB are needed to further elucidate the pathophysiological pathways and possible associations of unexplored biomarkers.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker; Older adults; Sedentary behaviour

PMID:
28025174
DOI:
10.1016/j.arr.2016.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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