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Am J Physiol. 1989 Oct;257(4 Pt 1):E520-30.

Exercise training increases the number of glucose transporters in rat adipose cells.

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1
Department of Medicine, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington 05405.

Abstract

We studied the mechanism for the increase in glucose transport activity that occurs in adipose cells of exercise-trained rats. Glucose transport activity, glucose metabolism, and the subcellular distribution of glucose transporters were measured in adipose cells from rats raised in wheel cages for 6 wk (mean total exercise 350 km/rat), age-matched sedentary controls, and young sedentary controls matched for adipose cell size. Basal rates of glucose transport and metabolism were greater in cells from exercise-trained rats compared with young controls, and insulin-stimulated rates were greater in the exercise-trained rats compared with both age-matched and young controls. The numbers of plasma membrane glucose transporters were not different among groups in the basal state; however, with insulin stimulation, cells from exercise-trained animals had significantly more plasma membrane transporters than young controls or age-matched controls. Exercise-trained rats also had more low-density microsomal transporters than control rats in the basal state. When the total number of glucose transporters/cell was calculated, the exercise-trained rats had 42% more transporters than did either control group. These studies demonstrate that the increased glucose transport and metabolism observed in insulin-stimulated adipose cells from exercise-trained rats is due, primarily, to an increase in the number of plasma membrane glucose transporters translocated from an enlarged intracellular pool.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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