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Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Apr 1;64(7):839-844. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciw856.

Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Network of Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine.
2
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and.
3
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
4
R.M. Alden Research Laboratory, Culver City, California; and.
5
Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Abstract

Background:

The rapid emergence of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) represents a major public health threat, including in the long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) setting. Our objective in this study was to describe the epidemiologic characteristics of CRKP in a network of US LTACHs.

Methods:

An observational study was performed among 64 LTACHs from January 2014 to March 2015. Clinical cultures were included, with the first CRKP isolate recovered from each patient per study quarter evaluated. LTACH and geographic area-based CRKP prevalence and clinical and microbiologic characteristics were described.

Results:

A total of 3846 K. pneumoniae cultures were identified, with an overall carbapenem resistance rate of 24.6%. There were significant differences in CRKP rates across geographic regions, with the highest in the West (42.2%). Of 946 CRKP isolates, 507 (53.6%) were from a respiratory source, 350 (37.0%) from a urinary source, and 9 (9.4%) from blood. Among 821 unique patients with CRKP colonization or infection, the median age was 73 years. There was a high prevalence of respiratory failure (39.8%) and the presence of a central venous catheter (50.9%) or tracheostomy (64.8%). Resistance rates of CRKP isolates were high for amikacin (59.2%) and fluoroquinolones (>97%). The resistance rate to colistin/polymyxin B was 16.1%.

Conclusions:

Nearly 25% of K. pneumoniae clinical isolates in a US network of LTACHs were CRKP. Expansion of national surveillance efforts and improved communication among LTACHs and acute care hospitals will be critical for reducing the continued emergence of CRKP across the healthcare continuum.

KEYWORDS:

Klebsiella pneumoniae; carbapenem resistance; long-term acute care hospitals.

PMID:
28013258
PMCID:
PMC5399931
DOI:
10.1093/cid/ciw856
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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