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Acta Biomater. 2017 Jul 1;56:91-101. doi: 10.1016/j.actbio.2016.12.042. Epub 2016 Dec 21.

Core-shell microparticles for protein sequestration and controlled release of a protein-laden core.

Author information

1
W.H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, 30332 Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: trinker3@gatech.edu.
2
W.H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, 30332 Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: bphilbrick@gatech.edu.
3
W.H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, 30332 Atlanta, GA, USA; Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 Ferst Drive, 30332 Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: johnna.temenoff@bme.gatech.edu.

Abstract

Development of multifunctional biomaterials that sequester, isolate, and redeliver cell-secreted proteins at a specific timepoint may be required to achieve the level of temporal control needed to more fully regulate tissue regeneration and repair. In response, we fabricated core-shell heparin-poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) microparticles (MPs) with a degradable PEG-based shell that can temporally control delivery of protein-laden heparin MPs. Core-shell MPs were fabricated via a re-emulsification technique and the number of heparin MPs per PEG-based shell could be tuned by varying the mass of heparin MPs in the precursor PEG phase. When heparin MPs were loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and then encapsulated into core-shell MPs, degradable core-shell MPs initiated similar C2C12 cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as the soluble control, while non-degradable core-shell MPs initiated a significantly lower response (85+19% vs. 9.0+4.8% of the soluble control, respectively). Similarly, when degradable core-shell MPs were formed and then loaded with BMP-2, they induced a ∼7-fold higher C2C12 ALP activity than the soluble control. As C2C12 ALP activity was enhanced by BMP-2, these studies indicated that degradable core-shell MPs were able to deliver a bioactive, BMP-2-laden heparin MP core. Overall, these dynamic core-shell MPs have the potential to sequester, isolate, and then redeliver proteins attached to a heparin core to initiate a cell response, which could be of great benefit to tissue regeneration applications requiring tight temporal control over protein presentation.

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE:

Tissue repair requires temporally controlled presentation of potent proteins. Recently, biomaterial-mediated binding (sequestration) of cell-secreted proteins has emerged as a strategy to harness the regenerative potential of naturally produced proteins, but this strategy currently only allows immediate amplification and re-delivery of these signals. The multifunctional, dynamic core-shell heparin-PEG microparticles presented here overcome this limitation by sequestering proteins through a PEG-based shell onto a protein-protective heparin core, temporarily isolating bound proteins from the cellular microenvironment, and re-delivering proteins only after degradation of the PEG-based shell. Thus, these core-shell microparticles have potential to be a novel tool to harness and isolate proteins produced in the cellular environment and then control when proteins are re-introduced for the most effective tissue regeneration and repair.

KEYWORDS:

Controlled release; Core-shell microparticles; Heparin; Hydrolytically degradable; Protein delivery

PMID:
28013102
PMCID:
PMC5478455
DOI:
10.1016/j.actbio.2016.12.042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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