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Int J Biometeorol. 2017 Jun;61(6):1139-1148. doi: 10.1007/s00484-016-1295-8. Epub 2016 Dec 23.

Can balneotherapy improve the bowel motility in chronically constipated middle-aged and elderly patients?

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Bursa Military Hospital, Bursa, Turkey. dandinoglu@gmail.com.
2
Department of General Surgery, Bursa Military Hospital, Bursa, Turkey.
3
Department of Radiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, Turkey.
4
Department of Surgery, Sevket Yılmaz Research And Training Hospital, Bursa, Turkey.
5
Mevki Military Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
6
Guven Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
7
Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA.

Abstract

Balneotherapy or spa therapy is usually known for different application forms of medicinal waters and its effects on the human body. Our purpose is to demonstrate the effect of balneotherapy on gastrointestinal motility. A total of 35 patients who were treated for osteoarthritis with balneotherapy from November 2013 through March 2015 at our hospital had a consultation at the general surgery for constipation and defecation disorders. Patients followed by constipation scores, short-form health survey (SF-12), and a colonic transit time (CTT) study before and after balneotherapy were included in this study, and the data of the patients were analyzed retrospectively. The constipation score, SF-12 score, and CTT were found statistically significant after balneotherapy (p < 0.05). The results of our study confirm the clinical finding that a 15-day course of balneotherapy with mineral water from a thermal spring (Bursa, Turkey) improves gastrointestinal motility and reduces laxative consumption in the management of constipation in middle-aged and elderly patients, and it is our belief that treatment with thermal mineral water could considerably improve the quality of life of these patients.

KEYWORDS:

Balneotherapy; Bowel motility; Constipation

PMID:
28011998
DOI:
10.1007/s00484-016-1295-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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