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Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2017 Apr;36:15-21. doi: 10.1016/j.pbi.2016.12.001. Epub 2016 Dec 21.

Co-evolution of methods and thoughts in cereal domestication studies: a tale of barley (Hordeum vulgare).

Author information

1
Institute of Plant Genetics, Heinrich-Heine-University, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany; Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany; Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences "From Complex Traits towards Synthetic Modules", 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: pankin@mpipz.mpg.de.
2
Institute of Plant Genetics, Heinrich-Heine-University, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany; Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany; Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences "From Complex Traits towards Synthetic Modules", 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: korff@mpipz.mpg.de.

Abstract

Five major cereals such as wheat, rice, maize, barley and sorghum were among the first Neolithic crops that facilitated the establishment of the early agricultural societies. Since then they have remained the staple source of calories for the majority of the human population. Ample archaeological and molecular evidence has provided important insights into the domestication history of cereals but the debates on the origin of cereal crops are still far from resolved. Here, we review the recent advances in applying genome sequencing technologies for deciphering the history of cereal domestication. As a model example, we demonstrate that the evolution of thoughts on barley domestication closely followed the development of views on the rise of agriculture in the Near East in general and greatly accelerated with the advent of the genomic technologies and resources available for barley research.

PMID:
28011443
DOI:
10.1016/j.pbi.2016.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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