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Eat Behav. 2017 Jan;24:45-48. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2016.11.005. Epub 2016 Dec 9.

Measurement of fidgeting in patients with anorexia nervosa using a novel shoe-based monitor.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical Center-Westchester Division, 21 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY 10605, United States. Electronic address: lab2032@med.cornell.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 98, New York, NY 10032, United States. Electronic address: lg2753@cumc.columbia.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, One Park Avenue, 8-131, New York, NY 10016, United States. Electronic address: Diane.Klein@nyumc.org.
4
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, United States, 35487. Electronic address: esazonov@eng.ua.edu.
5
Department of Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, One Park Avenue, 8-131, New York, NY 10016, United States. Electronic address: Kathryn.keegan@nyumc.org.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 98, New York, NY 10032, United States. Electronic address: eneustadt@gmail.com.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 98, New York, NY 10032, United States. Electronic address: btw1@cumc.columbia.edu.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 98, New York, NY 10032, United States. Electronic address: ea12@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To objectively assess seated non-exercise physical activity in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) relative to healthy controls (HCs) and examine the associations between this physical activity, eating disorder pathology, and levels of anxiety and depression.

METHOD:

Eleven inpatients with AN and 10 HCs wore a shoe-based accelerometer (SmartShoe) at three time points: a) while eating lunch, b) filling out questionnaires, and c) watching television for 1h.

RESULTS:

Across all three tasks, patients with AN were significantly more active than HCs, thereby engaging in a greater degree of restless or fidgeting behavior. Degree of physical activity was positively correlated with eating disorder psychopathology in the sample with AN, and a trend towards a positive association between physical activity and levels of depression and anxiety was also found in this sample. Among individuals with AN, physical activity was not significantly correlated with BMI, duration of illness, or number of days since hospital admission.

DISCUSSION:

Use of a minimally invasive, shoe-based monitor revealed patients with AN engaged in a greater degree of fidgeting relative to HCs during quiet, seated tasks and this heightened activity was related to measures of pathology. Non-exercise physical activity, including fidgeting, may warrant further clinical attention in this patient population.

KEYWORDS:

Anorexia nervosa; Anxiety; Depression; Eating disorders; Fidgeting; Physical activity

PMID:
28011408
PMCID:
PMC5258678
DOI:
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2016.11.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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