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Sci Total Environ. 2017 Mar 1;581-582:144-152. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.12.077. Epub 2016 Dec 20.

UV-based technologies for marine water disinfection and the application to ballast water: Does salinity interfere with disinfection processes?

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Technologies, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, CACYTMAR, University of Cádiz, Campus Universitario Puerto Real, Avda. República Saharaui s/n, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain. Electronic address: javier.moreno@uca.es.
2
Department of Environmental Technologies, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, CACYTMAR, University of Cádiz, Campus Universitario Puerto Real, Avda. República Saharaui s/n, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Abstract

Water contained on ships is employed in the majority of activities on a vessel; therefore, it is necessary to correctly manage through marine water treatments. Among the main water streams generated on vessels, ballast water appears to be an emerging global challenge (especially on cargo ships) due to the transport of invasive species and the significant impact that the ballast water discharge could have on ecosystems and human activities. To avoid this problem, ballast water treatment must be implemented prior to water discharge in accordance with the upcoming Ballast Water Management Convention. Different UV-based treatments (photolytic: UV-C and UV/H2O2, photocatalytic: UV/TiO2), have been compared for seawater disinfection. E. faecalis is proposed as a biodosimeter organism for UV-based treatments and demonstrates good properties for being considered as a Standard Test Organism for seawater. Inactivation rates by means of the UV-based treatments were obtained using a flow-through UV-reactor. Based on the two variables responses that were studied (kinetic rate constant and UV-Dose reductions), both advanced oxidation processes (UV/H2O2 and photocatalysis) were more effective than UV-C treatment. Evaluation of salinity on the processes suggests different responses according to the treatments: major interference on photocatalysis treatment and minimal impact on UV/H2O2.

KEYWORDS:

Ballast water; E. faecalis; Salinity interference; Seawater disinfection; UV-based treatments; UV-dose

PMID:
28011021
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.12.077
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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