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JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2016 Dec 26;9(24):2493-2507. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2016.09.044.

Incidence, Characteristics, Predictors, and Outcomes of Repeat Revascularization After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: The SYNTAX Trial at 5 Years.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: s.head@erasmusmc.nl.
3
The Heart Hospital, Baylor Health Care Systems, Plano, Texas.
4
Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
5
Department of Cardiology, Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Hopital Privé Jacques Cartier, Générale de Santé, Massy, France.
6
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Herzzentrum Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
7
Department of Cardiology, North Shore University Health System, Evanston, Illinois.
8
Department of Cardiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
9
Boston Scientific Corporation, Natick, Massachusetts.
10
Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The study sought to determine the incidence, predictors, characteristics, and outcomes of repeat revascularization during 5-year follow-up of the SYNTAX (Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With TAXUS and Cardiac Surgery) trial.

BACKGROUND:

Limited in-depth long-term data on repeat revascularization are available from randomized trials comparing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

METHODS:

Incidence and timing of repeat revascularization and its relation to the long-term composite safety endpoint of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction were analyzed in the SYNTAX trial (n = 1,800) using Kaplan-Meier analysis.

RESULTS:

At 5 years, repeat revascularization occurred more often after initial PCI than after initial CABG (25.9% vs. 13.7%, respectively; p < 0.001), and more often consisted of multiple repeat revascularizations (9.0% vs. 2.8%, respectively; p = 0.022). Significantly more repeat PCI procedures were performed on de novo lesions in patients after initial PCI than initial CABG (33.3% vs. 13.4%, respectively; p < 0.001). At 5-year follow-up, patients who underwent repeat revascularization versus patients not undergoing repeat revascularization had significantly higher rates of the composite safety endpoint of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction after initial PCI (33.8% vs. 16.6%, respectively; p < 0.001), and a trend was found after initial CABG (22.4% vs. 15.8%, respectively; p = 0.07). After multivariate adjustment, repeat revascularization was an independent predictor of the composite safety endpoint after both initial PCI (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6 to 3.0; p < 0.001) and initial CABG (HR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2 to 2.9; p = 0.011).

CONCLUSIONS:

Repeat revascularization rates are significantly higher after initial PCI than after initial CABG for complex coronary disease. Repeat revascularization is an independent predictor of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction for myocardial revascularization.

KEYWORDS:

SYNTAX; coronary artery bypass grafting; percutaneous coronary intervention; repeat revascularization

PMID:
28007201
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcin.2016.09.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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