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Elife. 2016 Dec 22;5. pii: e22283. doi: 10.7554/eLife.22283.

Immediate perception of a reward is distinct from the reward's long-term salience.

Author information

1
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, United States.
2
Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, United States.
3
Evolution, Génomes, Comportement & Ecologie, CNRS, IRD, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Paris, France.
4
AgroParisTech, Paris, France.
5
Department of Integrative and Molecular Physiology, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, United States.

Abstract

Reward perception guides all aspects of animal behavior. However, the relationship between the perceived value of a reward, the latent value of a reward, and the behavioral response remains unclear. Here we report that, given a choice between two sweet and chemically similar sugars-L- and D-arabinose-Drosophila melanogaster prefers D- over L- arabinose, but forms long-term memories of L-arabinose more reliably. Behavioral assays indicate that L-arabinose-generated memories require sugar receptor Gr43a, and calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings indicate that L- and D-arabinose differentially activate Gr43a-expressing neurons. We posit that the immediate valence of a reward is not always predictive of the long-term reinforcement value of that reward, and that a subset of sugar-sensing neurons may generate distinct representations of similar sugars, allowing for rapid assessment of the salient features of various sugar rewards and generation of reward-specific behaviors. However, how sensory neurons communicate information about L-arabinose quality and concentration-features relevant for long-term memory-remains unknown.

KEYWORDS:

D. melanogaster; memory; neuroscience; reward; salience

PMID:
28005005
PMCID:
PMC5243026
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.22283
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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