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Paediatr Drugs. 2017 Apr;19(2):131-137. doi: 10.1007/s40272-016-0207-z.

Gelatin Tannate for Acute Childhood Gastroenteritis: A Randomized, Single-Blind Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161, Rome, Italy. Maurizio.mennini@gmail.com.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161, Rome, Italy. Maurizio.mennini@gmail.com.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Second University of Naples, Viale Beneduce 10, 81100, Caserta, Italy.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161, Rome, Italy.
5
Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Oral rehydration therapy is the recommended treatment for acute childhood gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of gelatin tannate plus oral rehydration compared with oral rehydration alone.

METHODS:

We conducted a multicenter, parallel, randomized, controlled, single-blind, prospective, open-label trial. A central randomization center used computer generated tables to allocate treatments. The study was performed in two medical centers in Italy. Sixty patients 3-72 months of age with acute gastroenteritis were recruited (median age 18 months; age range 3-66 months): 29 received an oral rehydration solution (ORS) and 31 an ORS plus gelatin tannate (ORS + G). The primary outcome was the number of bowel movements 48 and 72 h after initiating treatment. Secondary outcomes were: duration of diarrhea, stool characteristics and adverse events.

RESULTS:

No patient was lost at follow-up. No significant difference in the number of bowel movements after 48 h was reported (2.7 ± 1.3 ORS + G; 3.2 ± 0.8 ORS; p = 0.06), although the ORS + G group showed a significant improvement in stool consistency (3.7 ± 1.0 vs. 4.3 ± 0.8; p = 0.005). At 72 h, a significant reduction in bowel movements was reported in the ORS + G group compared with the ORS group (1.0 ± 1.4 vs. 2.0 ± 1.7; p = 0.01). Mean duration of diarrhea was significantly lower in the ORS + G group than in the ORS only group (76.8 ± 19.2 vs. 108 ± 24.0 h; p < 0.0001). No adverse events were reported.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gelatin tannate added to oral rehydration in children with acute diarrhea was associated with a significant decrease in bowel movements at 72 h, with an early improvement in the stool consistency and shorter disease duration.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION:

NCT02644200-Gelatin Tannate as Treatment for Acute Childhood Gastroenteritis ( https://www.clinicaltrials.gov ).

PMID:
28000174
DOI:
10.1007/s40272-016-0207-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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