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J Community Health. 2017 Aug;42(4):688-700. doi: 10.1007/s10900-016-0305-4.

The Impact of Perceived Need and Relational Factors on Mental Health Service Use Among Generations of Asian Americans.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Center for Asian Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
2
Research in Social, Economic and Environmental Equity, School of Social Work, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, USA.
3
School of Social Policy & Practice, Center for Mental Health & Aging, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
5
Department of Sociology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
6
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Center for Asian Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. grace.ma@temple.edu.

Abstract

The present study examined generational differences in the patterns and predictors of formal and informal mental health service utilization among a nationally representative sample of 1850 Asian Americans from the National Latino and Asian American Study. We focused on the effects of perceived need and relational factors on service utilization among 1st-, 1.5-, and 2nd-generation Asian Americans. Results of hierarchical logistic regression showed significant intergenerational differences. Specifically, 1.5-generation Asian Americans exhibited distinctive pattern of service use, with perceived need being associated with a higher likelihood of using formal mental health services, but only for those with high level of social support. First- and second-generation Asian Americans, on the other hand, perceived need was independently associated with formal service use, and a significant predictor of informal service use for first generation. Greater family conflict was also associated with greater use of formal and informal services for both first- and second generations. However, family cohesion was associated with only informal service use among first -generation Asian Americans. Implications for mental health service policy were discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Asian Americans; Family cohesion; Family conflict; Mental health service use; Perceived need; Social support

PMID:
27999991
DOI:
10.1007/s10900-016-0305-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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