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Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2017 Apr;44:94-102. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2016.11.010. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

Health benefits of fermented foods: microbiota and beyond.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science & Technology, University of California, Davis, USA.
2
Danone Nutricia, Centre Daniel CArasso, Avenue de la Vauve - Route Départementale 128, 91120 Palaiseau, France.
3
National Dairy Council, 10255 W. Higgins Road, Rosemont, IL 60018, USA.
4
Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark and APC Microbiome Institute, Cork, Ireland.
5
Lille Inflammation Research International Center, Inserm U995, University of Lille, CHRU de Lille, France.
6
University of Alberta, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
7
Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Microbiology and Systems Biology, Zeist and VU University Amsterdam, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
8
California Dairy Research Foundation, 501 G Street, #203, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
9
Natural Resources Institute Finland, Myllytie 1, 31600 Jokioinen, Finland.
10
Wageningen University, Laboratory of Food Microbiology, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands.
11
Department of Food Science and Technology, 258 Food Innovation Center, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-6205, USA. Electronic address: rhutkins1@unl.edu.

Abstract

Fermented foods and beverages were among the first processed food products consumed by humans. The production of foods such as yogurt and cultured milk, wine and beer, sauerkraut and kimchi, and fermented sausage were initially valued because of their improved shelf life, safety, and organoleptic properties. It is increasingly understood that fermented foods can also have enhanced nutritional and functional properties due to transformation of substrates and formation of bioactive or bioavailable end-products. Many fermented foods also contain living microorganisms of which some are genetically similar to strains used as probiotics. Although only a limited number of clinical studies on fermented foods have been performed, there is evidence that these foods provide health benefits well-beyond the starting food materials.

PMID:
27998788
DOI:
10.1016/j.copbio.2016.11.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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