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J Adolesc Health. 2017 Apr;60(4):469-471. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.10.019. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

Effect of a Prior History of Overweight on Return of Menses in Adolescents With Eating Disorders.

Author information

1
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California.
2
The Craig Dalsimer Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
3
Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences, Yakima, Washington.
4
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: carlson2@stanford.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a history of overweight, weight suppression, and weight gain during treatment have an effect on return of menses (ROM) in adolescents with eating disorders (EDs).

METHODS:

Retrospective chart review of female adolescents presenting to an ED program from January 2007 to June 2009.

RESULTS:

One hundred sixty-three participants (mean age, 16.6 ± 2.1 years) met eligibility criteria. The mean median body mass index percent at ROM for those previously overweight was 106.1 ± 11.7 versus 94.2 ± 8.9 for those not previously overweight (p < .001). Both groups needed to gain weight for ROM. Greater weight suppression (odds ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.98; p = .013) was associated with lower likelihood of ROM, and greater weight gain during treatment (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.36; p = .002) was associated with higher likelihood of ROM in those not previously overweight.

CONCLUSIONS:

Previously overweight amenorrheic patients with EDs needed to be at a higher median body mass index percent for ROM compared to those who were not previously overweight.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Amenorrhea; Eating disorders; Overweight; Return of menses

PMID:
27998699
PMCID:
PMC6402567
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.10.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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