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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2017 Jan;123:97-105. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2016.11.012. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

Low testosterone and clinical outcomes in Chinese men with type 2 diabetes mellitus - Hong Kong Diabetes Registry.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong; Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong. Electronic address: kittyktcheung@cuhk.edu.hk.
2
Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong; Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong.
3
Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong; Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong; Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong.

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess the implications of low testosterone on cardiovascular risk factors, metabolic syndrome (MES) and clinical outcomes in Chinese men with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D).

METHODS:

A prospective cohort study carried out in a university hospital involving a consecutive cohort of 1239 Chinese men with T2D and a median disease duration of 9years followed up for 4.8years. Clinical characteristics, frequency of MES, serum total testosterone and clinical events were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to examine the independent association of low testosterone with MES after adjustment for confounding covariates. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to derive hazard ratio for clinical outcomes.

RESULTS:

More men with low testosterone had cardiovascular-renal disease and MES than those with normal testosterone. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of low testosterone for MES was 2.63 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.56-4.61). After a median follow-up of 4.8years, the hazard ratio (HR) of low testosterone was 2.22 (95% CI 1.23-4.01) for incident non-prostate cancer. In a multivariate Cox-regression model, the HRs were attenuated but remained significant with adjustment for MES and renal parameters.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chinese men with low testosterone had high prevalence of cardiovascular disease and MES with high incidence non-prostate cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Metabolic syndrome; Mortality; Testosterone; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
27997863
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2016.11.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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