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Expert Rev Proteomics. 2017 Feb;14(2):117-136. doi: 10.1080/14789450.2017.1274653. Epub 2017 Jan 5.

Proteomics in cardiovascular disease: recent progress and clinical implication and implementation.

Author information

1
a Biotechnology Division, Biomedical Research Foundation Academy of Athens , Athens , Greece.
2
b Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences , University of Glasgow , Glasgow , UK.
3
c Mosaiques Diagnostics , Hannover , Germany.

Abstract

Although multiple efforts have been initiated to shed light into the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease, it still remains one of the major causes of death worldwide. Proteomic approaches are unequivocally powerful tools that may provide deeper understanding into the molecular mechanisms associated with cardiovascular disease and improve its management. Areas covered: Cardiovascular proteomics is an emerging field and significant progress has been made during the past few years with the aim of defining novel candidate biomarkers and obtaining insight into molecular pathophysiology. To summarize the recent progress in the field, a literature search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science. As a result, 704 studies from PubMed and 320 studies from Web of Science were retrieved. Findings from original research articles using proteomics technologies for the discovery of biomarkers for cardiovascular disease in human are summarized in this review. Expert commentary: Proteins associated with cardiovascular disease represent pathways in inflammation, wound healing and coagulation, proteolysis and extracellular matrix organization, handling of cholesterol and LDL. Future research in the field should target to increase proteome coverage as well as integrate proteomics with other omics data to facilitate both drug development as well as clinical implementation of findings.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; biomarker; clinical proteomics; proteome; vascular disease

PMID:
27997814
DOI:
10.1080/14789450.2017.1274653
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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