Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JAMA. 2016 Dec 20;316(23):2525-2530. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.16776.

Serologic Screening for Genital Herpes Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco.
2
Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington.
3
University of Iowa, Iowa City.
4
Columbia University, New York, New York.
5
State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse.
6
Pima County Department of Health, Tucson, Arizona.
7
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
8
Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia9Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.
9
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
10
University of Alabama at Birmingham.
11
University of California, Los Angeles.
12
University of Washington, Seattle.
13
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.
14
University of Texas at Austin.
15
Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.
16
University of Hawaii, Manoa.

Abstract

Importance:

Genital herpes is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the United States, occurring in almost 1 in 6 persons aged 14 to 49 years. Infection is caused by 2 subtypes of the herpes simplex virus (HSV), HSV-1 and HSV-2. Antiviral medications may provide symptomatic relief from outbreaks but do not cure HSV infection. Neonatal herpes infection, while uncommon, can result in substantial morbidity and mortality.

Objective:

To update the 2005 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for genital herpes.

Evidence Review:

The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy, benefits, and harms of serologic screening for HSV-2 infection in asymptomatic persons, including those who are pregnant, as well as the effectiveness and harms of preventive medications and behavioral counseling interventions to reduce future symptomatic episodes and transmission to others.

Findings:

Based on the natural history of HSV infection, its epidemiology, and the available evidence on the accuracy of serologic screening tests, the USPSTF concluded that the harms outweigh the benefits of serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant.

Conclusions and Recommendation:

The USPSTF recommends against routine serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant. (D recommendation).

Summary for patients in

PMID:
27997659
DOI:
10.1001/jama.2016.16776
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center