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Sci Rep. 2016 Dec 20;6:39118. doi: 10.1038/srep39118.

Naa50/San-dependent N-terminal acetylation of Scc1 is potentially important for sister chromatid cohesion.

Author information

1
Departamento de Ciências Biomédicas e Medicina, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal.
2
Center for Biomedical Research (CBMR), University of Algarve, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal.
3
Department of Molecular Biology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.
4
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
5
Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

Abstract

The gene separation anxiety (san) encodes Naa50/San, a N-terminal acetyltransferase required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Although highly conserved among higher eukaryotes, the mitotic function of this enzyme is still poorly understood. Naa50/San was originally proposed to be required for centromeric sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila and human cells, yet, more recently, it was also suggested to be a negative regulator of microtubule polymerization through internal acetylation of beta Tubulin. We used genetic and biochemical approaches to clarify the function of Naa50/San during development. Our work suggests that Naa50/San is required during tissue proliferation for the correct interaction between the cohesin subunits Scc1 and Smc3. Our results also suggest a working model where Naa50/San N-terminally acetylates the nascent Scc1 polypeptide, and that this co-translational modification is subsequently required for the establishment and/or maintenance of sister chromatid cohesion.

PMID:
27996020
PMCID:
PMC5171793
DOI:
10.1038/srep39118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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