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Sci Rep. 2016 Dec 20;6:39479. doi: 10.1038/srep39479.

Intrinsic Photosensitivity Enhances Motility of T Lymphocytes.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3900 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington DC, 20007, USA.
2
Department of Biology, Vinh University, Vinh City, Vietnam.
3
Research Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC 20422, USA.

Abstract

Sunlight has important biological effects in human skin. Ultraviolet (UV) light striking the epidermis catalyzes the synthesis of Vitamin D and triggers melanin production. Although a causative element in skin cancers, sunlight is also associated with positive health outcomes including reduced incidences of autoimmune diseases and cancers. The mechanisms, however, by which light affects immune function remain unclear. Here we describe direct photon sensing in human and mouse T lymphocytes, a cell-type highly abundant in skin. Blue light irradiation at low doses (<300 mJ cm-2) triggers synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in T cells revealed by the genetically encoded reporter HyPerRed. In turn, H2O2 activates a Src kinase/phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) signaling pathway and Ca2+ mobilization. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic disruption of Lck kinase, PLC-γ1 or the T cell receptor complex inhibits light-evoked Ca2+ transients. Notably, both light and H2O2 enhance T-cell motility in a Lck-dependent manner. Thus, T lymphocytes possess intrinsic photosensitivity and this property may enhance their motility in skin.

PMID:
27995987
PMCID:
PMC5171715
DOI:
10.1038/srep39479
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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