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J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Dec 17;5(12). pii: e004287.

Late Survival After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Moderately Reduced Kidney Function.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Natalie.Glaser@ki.se.
2
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The influence of moderately reduced kidney function on late survival after surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. We analyzed survival after AVR in patients with moderately reduced kidney function.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

All patients who underwent primary AVR in Sweden 1997-2013 were identified from the Swedish Web system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies register. Patients were categorized according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of 13 102 patients, 9836 (75%) had normal kidney function (eGFR >60 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and 3266 (25%) had moderately reduced kidney function (eGFR 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m2). Mean follow-up time was 6.2 years. Mortality was higher in patients with moderately reduced kidney function; 5-, 10-, and 15-year survival was 76%, 48%, and 25% versus 89%, 73%, and 55% (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.28; 95% CI, 1.18-1.38; P<0.001). Patients with moderately reduced kidney function had a nonsignificantly higher risk of major bleeding (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.00-1.39; P=0.051) and a lower risk for aortic valve reoperation (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.38-0.79; P=0.001) compared to those with normal kidney function. In patients with moderately reduced kidney function, survival was similar in those who received bioprostheses compared to those who received mechanical valves (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.70-1.03; P=0.094).

CONCLUSIONS:

Moderately reduced kidney function was strongly associated with increased mortality after AVR. These results have important implications for preoperative risk stratification, and suggest that patients with eGFR 30 to 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 warrant careful observation after AVR.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION:

URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02276950.

KEYWORDS:

aortic valve replacement; cardiac surgery; chronic kidney disease

PMID:
27988497
PMCID:
PMC5210442
DOI:
10.1161/JAHA.116.004287
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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