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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2017 Jun;61(6). doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201600707. Epub 2017 Feb 22.

Association between dietary inflammatory index and inflammatory markers in the HELENA study.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
3
Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute of Food Science and Technology and Nutrition, Madrid, Spain.
4
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
5
GENUD "Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development" Research Group, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Faculty of Health Sciences Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.
6
Univ. Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, U995 - LIRIC - Lille Inflammation Research International Center, CIC 1403, Centre d'investigation Clinique, Lille, France.
7
ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences-INEF, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
8
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, España.
9
Department of Medical Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
10
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
11
Research Institute of Child Nutrition Dortmund, University of Bonn, Germany.
12
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, Lyon, France.
13
Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Unit, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Crete, Greece.
14
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Clinical Nutrition, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
15
Department of Pediatrics, University of Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous research has shown that diet is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation among adults. However, no study has yet been conducted to explore the association between inflammatory potential of diet and low-grade systemic inflammation among adolescents whose dietary behavior may be different from adults.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We examine the predictive ability of 24-h recall-derived dietary inflammatory index (DII) scores on inflammation among 532 European adolescents in the HELENA cross-sectional study. The DII is a literature-derived dietary index developed to predict inflammation. The DII was calculated per 1000 calories and was tested against C-reactive protein, ILs-1,2,4,10, TNF-α, ICAM, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), and IFN-γ. All inflammatory markers had nonnormal distributions and therefore were log transformed. Analyses were performed using multivariable linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, city, BMI, smoking, and physical activity. Pro-inflammatory diet (higher DII scores) was associated with increased levels of various inflammatory markers: TNF-α, IL-1, 2, IFN-γ,  and vascular cell adhesion molecule (bDIIt3vs1 = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.001, 0.25; 0.13, 95% CI 0.001, 0.25; 0.40, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.77; 0.53, 95% CI: 0.05, 1.01; 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.13, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

These results reinforce the fact that diet, as a whole, plays an important role in modifying inflammation in adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Cross-sectional; Diet; HELENA; Inflammation

PMID:
27981781
PMCID:
PMC5517083
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201600707
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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