Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Addiction. 2017 Apr;112(4):586-593. doi: 10.1111/add.13719. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Alcohol use disorder and divorce: evidence for a genetic correlation in a population-based Swedish sample.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
2
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
3
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
4
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
6
Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

We tested the association between alcohol use disorder (AUD) and divorce; estimated the genetic and environmental influences on divorce; estimated how much genetic and environmental influences accounted for covariance between AUD and divorce; and estimated latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce. We tested sex differences in these effects.

DESIGN:

We identified twin and sibling pairs with AUD and divorce information in Swedish national registers. We described the association between AUD and divorce using tetrachorics and used twin and sibling models to estimate genetic and environmental influences on divorce, on the covariance between AUD and divorce and the latent genetic and environmental correlations between AUD and divorce.

SETTING:

Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 670 836 individuals (53% male) born 1940-1965.

MEASUREMENTS:

Life-time measures of AUD and divorce.

FINDINGS:

AUD and divorce were related strongly (males: rtet  = +0.44, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.45; females rtet  = +0.37, 95% CI = 0.36, 0.38). Genetic factors accounted for a modest proportion of the variance in divorce (males: 21.3%, 95% CI = 7.6, 28.5; females: 31.0%, 95% CI = 18.8, 37.1). Genetic factors accounted for most of the covariance between AUD and divorce (males: 52.0%, 95% CI = 48.8, 67.9; females: 53.74%, 95% CI = 17.6, 54.5), followed by non-shared environmental factors (males: 45.0%, 95% CI = 37.5, 54.9; females: 41.6%, 95% CI = 40.3, 60.2). Shared environmental factors accounted for a negligible proportion of the covariance (males: 3.0%, 95% CI = -3.0, 13.5; females: 4.75%, 95% CI = 0.0, 6.6). The AUD-divorce genetic correlations were high (males: rA = +0.76, 95% CI = 0.53, 0.90; females +0.52, 95% CI = 0.24, 0.67). The non-shared environmental correlations were modest (males: rE = +0.32, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.40; females: +0.27, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.36).

CONCLUSIONS:

Divorce and alcohol use disorder are correlated strongly in the Swedish population, and the heritability of divorce is consistent with previous studies. Covariation between AUD and divorce results from overlapping genetic and non-shared environmental factors. Latent genetic and non-shared environmental correlations for alcohol use disorder and divorce are high and moderate.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol use disorder; divorce; genetic correlation; heritability; nonshared environmental correlation; twin modeling

PMID:
27981669
PMCID:
PMC5339032
DOI:
10.1111/add.13719
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center