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Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 May;274(5):2071-2078. doi: 10.1007/s00405-016-4422-6. Epub 2016 Dec 16.

The role of bone resorption in the etiopathogenesis of acquired middle ear cholesteatoma.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410008, Hunan, China.
2
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011, Hunan, China.
3
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011, Hunan, China. lw-007@163.com.

Abstract

Cholesteatoma is a destructive squamous epithelial lesion of the temporal bone which gradually expands and leads to serious complications by destruction of nearby bony structures. Erosion caused by bone resorption of the ossicular chain and bony labyrinth may result in hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, facial paralysis, labyrinthine fistulae and intracranial complications. The exact underlying cellular and molecular mechanism of bone resorption in acquired cholesteatoma still remains unexplained. Pubmed database and China National Knowledge Infrastructure were screened for articles focusing on bone resorption in acquired cholesteatoma. Osteoclast activation, pressure necrosis, acid lysis, enzyme mediation, inflammatory mediators and several newly discovered biomolecules are outlined as main theories behind bone resorption in acquired cholesteatoma, aiming to facilitate the development of potential therapeutic targets for preventing intracranial and extracranial complications caused by bone resorption in acquired middle ear cholesteatoma.

KEYWORDS:

Bone resorption; Cholesteatoma; Etiopathogenesis; Osteoclast

PMID:
27981350
DOI:
10.1007/s00405-016-4422-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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