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Integr Med (Encinitas). 2016 Oct;15(5):14-16.

Intestinal Microbiome, Akkermansia muciniphila, and Medical Nutrition Therapy.

Author information

1
, , is the president and founder of the Personalized Lifestyle Medicine Institute in Seattle, Washington. He has been an internationally recognized leader in nutrition medicine for more than 25 years. Dr Bland is the cofounder of the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM) and is chairman emeritus of IFM's Board of Directors. He is the author of the 2014 book The Disease Delusion: Conquering the Causes of Chronic Illness for a Healthier, Longer, and Happier Life.

Abstract

The gastrointestinal microbiome has become a topic of great interest in medicine in recent years. Genomic sequencing can now be done at a fraction of the cost of a few years ago, and this has allowed for the development and compilation of an extensive amount of data related to the species diversity of the human gastrointestinal microbiome.1 Studies have demonstrated that the intestinal microbiome is sensitive to the composition of the diet.2 It is also recognized that the composition of the microbiome can be altered rapidly in response to dietary changes, stress, chemical exposure, and exercise.3 Both the expanded understanding of the composition of the human microbiome and the ability to measure it through genomic analysis of the stool have resulted in clinicians frequently wanting to know what actionable conclusions can be taken away from an analysis of the gastrointestinal microbiome.

PMID:
27980489
PMCID:
PMC5145007

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