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Br J Psychiatry. 2017 Apr;210(4):269-275. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.187682. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

Psychosis in autism: comparison of the features of both conditions in a dually affected cohort.

Author information

1
Felicity V. Larson, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Department of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham and Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; Adam P. Wagner, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care, East of England, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Peter B. Jones, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care, East of England, Cambridge and Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK; Digby Tantam, BM, BCh, PhD, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; Meng-Chuan Lai, MD PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Child and Youth Mental Health Collaborative at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and The Hospital for Sick Children, and Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada and Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Simon Baron-Cohen, PhD, Anthony J. Holland, MBBS MPhil, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care, East of England, Cambridge and Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK fxl437@bham.ac.uk.
2
Felicity V. Larson, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Department of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham and Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; Adam P. Wagner, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care, East of England, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Peter B. Jones, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care, East of England, Cambridge and Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK; Digby Tantam, BM, BCh, PhD, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; Meng-Chuan Lai, MD PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Child and Youth Mental Health Collaborative at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and The Hospital for Sick Children, and Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada and Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Simon Baron-Cohen, PhD, Anthony J. Holland, MBBS MPhil, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care, East of England, Cambridge and Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

BackgroundThere is limited information on the presentation and characteristics of psychotic illness experienced by people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).AimsTo describe autistic and psychotic phenomenology in a group of individuals with comorbid ASD and psychosis (ASD-P) and compare this group with populations affected by either, alone.MethodWe studied 116 individuals with ASD-P. We compared features of their ASD with people with ASD and no comorbid psychosis (ASD-NP), and clinical characteristics of psychosis in ASD-P with people with psychosis only.ResultsIndividuals with ASD-P had more diagnoses of atypical psychosis and fewer of schizophrenia compared with individuals with psychosis only. People with ASD-P had fewer stereotyped interests/behaviours compared with those with ASD-NP.ConclusionsOur data show there may be a specific subtype of ASD linked to comorbid psychosis. The results support findings that psychosis in people with ASD is often atypical, particularly regarding affective disturbance.

PMID:
27979819
PMCID:
PMC5376719
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.116.187682
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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