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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Dec 10;13(12). pii: E1227.

Impact of an 8-Month Trial Using Height-Adjustable Desks on Children's Classroom Sitting Patterns and Markers of Cardio-Metabolic and Musculoskeletal Health.

Author information

1
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia. a.contardoayala@deakin.edu.au.
2
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia. jo.salmon@deakin.edu.au.
3
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia. anna.timperio@deakin.edu.au.
4
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia. b.sudholz@deakin.edu.au.
5
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia. nicky.ridgers@deakin.edu.au.
6
Physical Activity Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia. Parneet.Sethi@bakeridi.edu.au.
7
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia. David.Dunstan@bakeridi.edu.au.
8
Physical Activity Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia. David.Dunstan@bakeridi.edu.au.
9
Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia. David.Dunstan@bakeridi.edu.au.

Abstract

During school hours, children can sit for prolonged and unbroken periods of time. This study investigated the impact of an 8-month classroom-based intervention focusing on reducing and breaking-up sitting time on children's cardio-metabolic risk factors (i.e., body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure) and perceptions of musculoskeletal discomfort. Two Year-6 classes (24 students per class) in one primary school were assigned to either an intervention or control classroom. The intervention classroom was equipped with height-adjustable desks and the teacher was instructed in the delivery of pedagogical strategies to reduce and break-up sitting in class. The control classroom followed standard practice using traditional furniture. At baseline, and after 8-months, time spent sitting, standing, stepping, and sitting-bouts (occasions of continuous sitting) as well as the frequency of sit-to-stand transitions were obtained from activPAL inclinometers and the time spent in light-intensity physical activity was obtained from ActiGraph accelerometers. Demographics and musculoskeletal characteristics were obtained from a self-report survey. Hierarchical linear mixed models found that during class-time, children's overall time spent sitting in long bouts (>10 min) were lower and the number of sit-to-stand transitions were higher in the intervention group compared to the control group, while no changes were observed for musculoskeletal pain/discomfort. No significant intervention effects were found for the anthropometrics measures and blood pressure. Height-adjustable desks and pedagogical strategies to reduce/break-up sitting can positively modify classroom sitting patterns in children. Longer interventions, larger and varied sample size may be needed to show health impacts; however, these desks did not increase musculoskeletal pain/discomfort.

KEYWORDS:

anthropometric measures; blood pressure; classroom-based intervention; height-adjustable desks; musculoskeletal health; school-age children; sitting time

PMID:
27973414
PMCID:
PMC5201368
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph13121227
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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