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Food Chem. 2017 Apr 15;221:613-619. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.11.130. Epub 2016 Nov 24.

Stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) and HS-SPME-GCMS quantification of key aroma volatiles for fruit and sap of Australian mango cultivars.

Author information

1
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture & Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, Coopers Plains, Queensland, Australia; School of Agriculture & Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Gatton & St Lucia, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: tram.san@uq.net.au.
2
School of Agriculture & Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Gatton & St Lucia, Queensland, Australia; Department of Agriculture and Forestry, Brisbane and Nambour, Queensland, Australia.
3
Department of Agriculture and Forestry, Brisbane and Nambour, Queensland, Australia.
4
Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.
5
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
6
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture & Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, Coopers Plains, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: h.smyth@uq.edu.au.

Abstract

Reported herein is a high throughput method to quantify in a single analysis the key volatiles that contribute to the aroma of commercially significant mango cultivars grown in Australia. The method constitutes stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) in conjunction with headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Deuterium labelled analogues of the target analytes were either purchased commercially or synthesised for use as internal standards. Seven volatiles, hexanal, 3-carene, α-terpinene, p-cymene, limonene, α-terpinolene and ethyl octanoate, were targeted. The resulting calibration functions had determination coefficients (R2) ranging from 0.93775 to 0.99741. High recovery efficiencies for spiked mango samples were also achieved. The method was applied to identify the key aroma volatile compounds produced by 'Kensington Pride' and 'B74' mango fruit and by 'Honey Gold' mango sap. This method represents a marked improvement over current methods for detecting and measuring concentrations of mango fruit and sap volatiles.

KEYWORDS:

Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS); Mangifera indica; Mango fruit; Solid-phase microextraction (SPME); Stable-isotope dilution assay (SIDA); Volatiles

PMID:
27979249
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.11.130
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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