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Food Funct. 2017 Jan 25;8(1):241-249. doi: 10.1039/c6fo01274d.

Effects of liquid oil vs. oleogel co-ingested with a carbohydrate-rich meal on human blood triglycerides, glucose, insulin and appetite.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore. Jeya_Henry@sics.a-star.edu.sg.
2
Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.
3
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore. Jeya_Henry@sics.a-star.edu.sg and Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

We examined the differences in how coconut oil in a liquid or oleogel form affects blood triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and appetite when co-ingested with a carbohydrate-rich meal. This was a randomised, controlled, crossover study where eligible participants attended a screening visit where baseline demographics were measured. On test days, participants arrived at the laboratory after an overnight fast of 10 hours. Upon arrival, cannulation of the antecubital vein was performed and fasting capillary blood glucose, plasma insulin and triglyceride levels, and appetite sensations were measured. Following that, orange juice and rice porridge alone (control), or with 22.25 g of coconut oil (CO) or 25 g of coconut oleogel (CG) (22.25 g coconut oil + 2.75 g ethylcellulose to form an oleogel) was consumed. Subsequently, capillary blood glucose and plasma insulin and triglyceride levels were measured at fixed intervals for 6 hours. Appetite sensations were also measured using visual analog scales every 30 minutes. Sixteen healthy young adult males completed the study (age = 27 ± 6 years, weight = 65.5 ± 5.5 kg, BMI = 21.9 ± 1.7 kg m-2). After test meals, glucose, insulin, triglycerides and appetite sensations changed significantly (time effects, p < 0.001). Significant time × treatment effects were found only in postprandial glucose (p = 0.015) and triglyceride (p = 0.001) changes. CO reduced the peak of the glucose response, and increased the incremental area under the curve for postprandial triglycerides. CG produced outcomes comparable to those of the control treatment. Appetite sensations did not differ between all treatments. The gelling of coconut oil with ethylcellulose into an oleogel form reversed its effects on postprandial glucose and triglycerides.

PMID:
27966722
DOI:
10.1039/c6fo01274d
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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