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Pediatr Radiol. 2017 Feb;47(2):169-177. doi: 10.1007/s00247-016-3741-5. Epub 2016 Dec 13.

Magnetic resonance tissue phase mapping demonstrates altered left ventricular diastolic function in children with chronic kidney disease.

Author information

1
Department of General Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine and Neonatology, Center for Pediatrics, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Mathildenstr. 1, 79106,, Freiburg, Germany. Charlotte.Gimpel@uniklinik-freiburg.de.
2
Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
3
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
4
Department of Cardiology and Angiology I, University Heart Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
5
University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
6
Pediatric Heart Center, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
7
Department of General Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine and Neonatology, Center for Pediatrics, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Mathildenstr. 1, 79106,, Freiburg, Germany.
8
Department of Radiology, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
9
Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, 737 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL, USA.
10
Department of Pediatric and Congenital Cardiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Echocardiographic examinations have revealed functional cardiac abnormalities in children with chronic kidney disease.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the feasibility of MRI tissue phase mapping in children and to assess regional left ventricular wall movements in children with chronic kidney disease.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Twenty pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (before or after renal transplantation) and 12 healthy controls underwent tissue phase mapping (TPM) to quantify regional left ventricular function through myocardial long (Vz) and short-axis (Vr) velocities at all 3 levels of the left ventricle.

RESULTS:

Patients and controls (age: 8 years-20 years) were matched for age, height, weight, gender and heart rate. Patients had higher systolic blood pressure. No patient had left ventricular hypertrophy on MRI or diastolic dysfunction on echocardiography. Fifteen patients underwent tissue Doppler echocardiography, with normal z-scores for mitral early diastolic (VE), late diastolic (VA) and peak systolic (VS) velocities. Throughout all left ventricular levels, peak diastolic Vz and Vr (cm/s) were reduced in patients: Vzbase -10.6 ± 1.9 vs. -13.4 ± 2.0 (P < 0.0003), Vzmid -7.8 ± 1.6 vs. -11 ± 1.5 (P < 0.0001), Vzapex -3.8 ± 1.6 vs. -5.3 ± 1.6 (P = 0.01), Vrbase -4.2 ± 0.8 vs. -4.9 ± 0.7 (P = 0.01), Vrmid -4.7 ± 0.7 vs. -5.4 ± 0.7 (P = 0.01), Vrapex -4.7 ± 1.4 vs. -5.6 ± 1.1 (P = 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Tissue phase mapping is feasible in children and adolescents. Children with chronic kidney disease show significantly reduced peak diastolic long- and short-axis left ventricular wall velocities, reflecting impaired early diastolic filling. Thus, tissue phase mapping detects chronic kidney disease-related functional myocardial changes before overt left ventricular hypertrophy or echocardiographic diastolic dysfunction occurs.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Cardiac imaging technique; Cardio renal syndrome; Chronic renal failure; Left ventricular dysfunction; Magnetic resonance imaging; Tissue phase mapping

PMID:
27966039
DOI:
10.1007/s00247-016-3741-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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