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Gut Liver. 2017 Mar 15;11(2):237-242. doi: 10.5009/gnl16132.

Positive Glucose Breath Tests in Patients with Hysterectomy, Gastrectomy, and Cholecystectomy.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
2
Department of Surgery, St. Vincent's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Background/Aims:

This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries, such as gastrectomy, cholecystectomy, and hysterectomy.

Methods:

One hundred seventy-one patients with surgery (50 hysterectomy, 14 gastrectomy, and 107 cholecystectomy), 665 patients with functional gastrointestinal disease (FGID) and 30 healthy controls undergoing a hydrogen (H2)-methane (CH4) glucose breath test (GBT) were reviewed.

Results:

GBT positivity (+) was significantly different among the surgical patients (43.9%), FGID patients (31.9%), and controls (13.3%) (p<0.01). With respect to the patients, 65 (38.0%), four (2.3%), and six (3.5%) surgical patients and 150 (22.6%), 30 (4.5%), and 32 (4.8%) FGID patients were in the GBT (H2)+, (CH4)+ and (mixed)+ groups, respectively (p<0.01). The gastrectomy group had a significantly increased preference in GBT+ (71.4% vs 42.0% or 41.1%, respectively) and GBT (H2)+ (64.3% vs 32.0% or 37.4%, respectively) compared with the hysterectomy or cholecystectomy groups (p<0.01). During GBT, the total H2 was significantly increased in the gastrectomy group compared with the other groups.

Conclusions:

SIBO producing H2 is common in abdominal surgical patients. Different features for GBT+ may be a result of the types of abdominal surgery.

KEYWORDS:

Cholecystectomy; Gastrectomy; Glucose breath test; Hysterectomy

PMID:
27965476
PMCID:
PMC5347648
DOI:
10.5009/gnl16132
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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