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Clin Rheumatol. 2017 Mar;36(3):661-669. doi: 10.1007/s10067-016-3484-6. Epub 2016 Dec 12.

Autologous whole blood versus corticosteroid local injection in treatment of plantar fasciitis: A randomized, controlled multicenter clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Imam Hossein Educational Hospital, School of medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Shahid Modarres Hospital, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Research Center, School of medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. a_raeissadat@sbmu.ac.ir.
3
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Research Center, School of medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
4
Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital, School of medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Local injection modalities are among treatment options in patients with resistant pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of local autologous whole blood compared with corticosteroid local injection in treatment of plantar fasciitis. In this randomized controlled multicenter study, 36 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis were recruited. Patients were allocated randomly into three treatment groups: local autologous blood, local corticosteroid injection, and control groups receiving no injection. Patients were assessed with visual analog scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and plantar fasciitis pain/disability scale (PFPS) before treatment, as well as 4 and 12 weeks post therapy. Variables of pain and function improved significantly in both corticosteroid and autologous blood groups compared to control group. At 4 weeks following treatment, patients in corticosteroid group had significantly lower levels of pain than patients in autologous blood and control groups (higher PPT level, lower PFPS, and VAS). After 12 weeks of treatment, both corticosteroid and autologous blood groups had lower average levels of pain than control group. The corticosteroid group showed an early sharp and then more gradual improvement in pain scores, but autologous blood group had a steady gradual drop in pain. Autologous whole blood and corticosteroid local injection can both be considered as effective methods in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. These treatments decrease pain and significantly improve function compared to no treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Autologous whole blood; Corticosteriod; Plantar fasciitis

PMID:
27957618
DOI:
10.1007/s10067-016-3484-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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