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Urol Oncol. 2017 Mar;35(3):112.e1-112.e11. doi: 10.1016/j.urolonc.2016.10.018. Epub 2016 Dec 10.

Dynamics of three-dimensional telomere profiles of circulating tumor cells in patients with high-risk prostate cancer who are undergoing androgen deprivation and radiation therapies.

Author information

1
Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
2
Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
3
Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Systems Biology Research Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden.
4
Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
5
Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: harvey.quon@albertahealthservices.ca.
6
Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: sabine.mai@umanitoba.ca.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Accurate assessment and monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy of locally advanced prostate cancer remains a major clinical challenge. Contrary to prostate biopsies, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a cellular source repeatedly obtainable by blood sampling and could serve as a surrogate marker for treatment efficacy. In this study, we used size-based filtration to isolate and enumerate CTCs from the blood of 20 patients with high-risk (any one of cT3, Gleason 8-10, or prostate-specific antigen>20ng/ml), nonmetastatic, and treatment-naive prostate cancer before and after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radiation therapy (RT).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We performed 3D telomere-specific quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization on isolated CTCs to determine 3D telomere profiles for each patient before and throughout the course of both ADT and RT.

RESULTS:

Based on the distinct 3D telomere signatures of CTC before treatment, patients were divided into 3 groups. ADT and RT resulted in distinct changes in 3D telomere signatures of CTCs, which were unique for each of the 3 patient groups.

CONCLUSION:

The ability of 3D telomere analysis of CTCs to identify disease heterogeneity among a clinically homogeneous group of patients, which reveals differences in therapeutic responses, provides a new opportunity for better treatment monitoring and management of patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; Circulating tumor cells; High-risk prostate cancer; Telomeres

PMID:
27956006
DOI:
10.1016/j.urolonc.2016.10.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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