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Brain Lang. 2017 Mar;166:1-18. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2016.11.004. Epub 2016 Dec 9.

Engagement of the left extrastriate body area during body-part metaphor comprehension.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
2
AU MRI Research Center, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA; Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA; Alabama Advanced Imaging Consortium, Auburn University & University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA.
3
AU MRI Research Center, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
5
Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA; Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Rehabilitation R&D Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation, Atlanta VAMC, Decatur, GA, USA. Electronic address: krish.sathian@emory.edu.

Abstract

Grounded cognition explanations of metaphor comprehension predict activation of sensorimotor cortices relevant to the metaphor's source domain. We tested this prediction for body-part metaphors using functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants heard sentences containing metaphorical or literal references to body parts, and comparable control sentences. Localizer scans identified body-part-specific motor, somatosensory and visual cortical regions. Both subject- and item-wise analyses showed that, relative to control sentences, metaphorical but not literal sentences evoked limb metaphor-specific activity in the left extrastriate body area (EBA), paralleling the EBA's known visual limb-selectivity. The EBA focus exhibited resting-state functional connectivity with ipsilateral semantic processing regions. In some of these regions, the strength of resting-state connectivity correlated with individual preference for verbal processing. Effective connectivity analyses showed that, during metaphor comprehension, activity in some semantic regions drove that in the EBA. These results provide converging evidence for grounding of metaphor processing in domain-specific sensorimotor cortical activity.

KEYWORDS:

Effective connectivity; Embodied cognition; Grounded cognition; Resting-state functional connectivity; Visual cortex; fMRI

PMID:
27951437
DOI:
10.1016/j.bandl.2016.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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