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Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2016 Dec;1386(1):45-68. doi: 10.1111/nyas.13299.

Disease drivers of aging.

Author information

1
National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, Maryland.
2
Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
4
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
5
University of Colorado-Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, Colorado.
6
Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota.
7
Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, California.
8
David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
9
Department of Physiology and Cardiovascular Research Center, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
10
Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas.
11
Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
12
Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.
13
University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, Alabama.
14
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
15
Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, New York.
16
City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California.
17
University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California.

Abstract

It has long been known that aging, at both the cellular and organismal levels, contributes to the development and progression of the pathology of many chronic diseases. However, much less research has examined the inverse relationship-the contribution of chronic diseases and their treatments to the progression of aging-related phenotypes. Here, we discuss the impact of three chronic diseases (cancer, HIV/AIDS, and diabetes) and their treatments on aging, putative mechanisms by which these effects are mediated, and the open questions and future research directions required to understand the relationships between these diseases and aging.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; age-related; aging; cancer; chronic; diabetes; disease; pathology; prevention

PMID:
27943360
PMCID:
PMC5373660
DOI:
10.1111/nyas.13299
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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