Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Cell Biol. 2017 Jan 2;216(1):101-113. doi: 10.1083/jcb.201605001. Epub 2016 Dec 9.

Constitutive centromere-associated network controls centromere drift in vertebrate cells.

Author information

  • 1Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.
  • 2Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetics and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan.
  • 3Comparative Genomics Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan.
  • 4National Institute of Informatics, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430, Japan.
  • 5DNA Data Analysis Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan.
  • 6Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan tfukagawa@fbs.osaka-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Centromeres are specified by sequence-independent epigenetic mechanisms, and the centromere position may drift at each cell cycle, but once this position is specified, it may not be frequently moved. Currently, it is unclear whether the centromere position is stable. To address this question, we systematically analyzed the position of nonrepetitive centromeres in 21 independent clones isolated from a laboratory stock of chicken DT40 cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massive parallel sequencing analysis with anti-CENP-A antibody. We demonstrated that the centromere position varies among the clones, suggesting that centromere drift occurs during cell proliferation. However, when we analyzed this position in the subclones obtained from one isolated clone, the position was found to be relatively stable. Interestingly, the centromere drift was shown to occur frequently in CENP-U- and CENP-S-deficient cells. Based on these results, we suggest that the centromere position can change after many cell divisions, but this drift is suppressed in short-term cultures, and the complete centromere structure contributes to the suppression of the centromere drift.

PMID:
27940888
PMCID:
PMC5223601
[Available on 2017-07-02]
DOI:
10.1083/jcb.201605001
[PubMed - in process]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center