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Environ Int. 2017 Feb;99:97-106. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.029. Epub 2016 Dec 8.

From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical-induced adverse effects.

Author information

1
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: beate.escher@ufz.de.
2
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.
3
Leipzig University, Rudolf Boehm Institute for Pharmacology & Toxicology, Clinical Pharmacology, Haertelstr. 16-18, 04107 Leipzig, Germany.
4
European Commission Joint Research Centre, Directorate F - Health, Consumers and Reference Materials, Via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra, VA, Italy.
5
University London, Imperial College, Department Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, St Marys Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, England, United Kingdom.
6
Toxicological Center, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk-Antwerp, Belgium.
7
German Environment Agency UBA, Dessau-Roßlau, Germany.
8
Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, A.B. Hancock Jr. Memorial Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department Biochemistry, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
9
US Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, USA; Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA.
10
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; University of Konstanz, Germany.
11
Maastricht University, Department Toxicogenomics, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
12
Vrije Universiteit, Faculty of Earth & Life Sciences, Institute for Environmental Studies, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
13
Dept of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
14
King's College London, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health, Analytical & Environmental Sciences Division, London SE1 9NH, England, United Kingdom.
15
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany; Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute for Organic Chemistry, 09596 Freiberg, Germany.
16
Institute Pasteur, Systems Biology Laboratory, Paris, France.
17
US EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA.
18
US EPA, National Center for Computational Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA.

Abstract

The exposome encompasses an individual's exposure to exogenous chemicals, as well as endogenous chemicals that are produced or altered in response to external stressors. While the exposome concept has been established for human health, its principles can be extended to include broader ecological issues. The assessment of exposure is tightly interlinked with hazard assessment. Here, we explore if mechanistic understanding of the causal links between exposure and adverse effects on human health and the environment can be improved by integrating the exposome approach with the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept that structures and organizes the sequence of biological events from an initial molecular interaction of a chemical with a biological target to an adverse outcome. Complementing exposome research with the AOP concept may facilitate a mechanistic understanding of stress-induced adverse effects, examine the relative contributions from various components of the exposome, determine the primary risk drivers in complex mixtures, and promote an integrative assessment of chemical risks for both human and environmental health.

KEYWORDS:

AOP; Exposome; Risk assessment; Systems biology; Systems chemistry; Systems toxicology

PMID:
27939949
PMCID:
PMC6116522
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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