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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Mar;137:172-178. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2016.11.030. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grown in arsanilic acid-elevated paddy soil.

Author information

1
Public Monitoring Center for Agro-product of Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Research Center of Trace Elements of Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, Hubei, People's Republic of China.
2
Public Monitoring Center for Agro-product of Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.
3
Research Center of Trace Elements of Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, Hubei, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: wlshzn@126.com.
4
Key Laboratory of Testing and Evaluation for Agro-Product Safety and Quality, Ministry of Agriculture, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.
5
Laboratory of Quality & Safety Risk Assessment for Agro-product (Guangzhou), Ministry of Agriculture, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

P-arsanilic acid (AsA) is a emerging but less concerned contaminant used in animal feeding operations, for it can be degraded to more toxic metabolites after being excreted by animals. Rice is the staple food in many parts of the world, and also more efficient in accumulating arsenic (As) compared to other cereals. However, the uptake and transformation of AsA by rice is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the potential risk of using AsA as a feed additive and using the AsA contaminated animal manure as a fertilizer. Five rice cultivars were grown in soil containing 100mg AsA/kg soil, after harvest, As species and their concentrations in different tissues were determined. Total As concentration of the hybrid rice cultivar was more than conventional rice cultivars for whole rice plant. For rice organs, the highest As concentration was found in roots. AsA could be absorbed by rice, partly degraded and converted to arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, arsenate. The number of As species and their concentrations in each cultivar were related to their genotypes. The soil containing 100mg AsA/kg or more is unsuitable for growing rice. The use of AsA and the disposal of animal manure requires detailed attention.

KEYWORDS:

Accumulation; Arsanilic acid; Arsenic speciation; HPLC-ICP-MS; Metabolism; Rice

PMID:
27936403
DOI:
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2016.11.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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