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PLoS One. 2016 Dec 9;11(12):e0168016. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0168016. eCollection 2016.

Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella enterica Recovered from Clinical Samples from Cattle and Swine in Minnesota, 2006 to 2015.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, United States of America.
2
Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, United States of America.
3
Epi-interactive, Wellington, New Zealand.
4
School of Statistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, United States of America.

Abstract

Salmonellosis remains one of the leading causes of foodborne disease worldwide despite preventive efforts at various stages of the food production chain. The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica represents an additional challenge for public health authorities. Food animals are considered a major reservoir and potential source of foodborne salmonellosis; thus, monitoring of Salmonella strains in livestock may help to detect emergence of new serotypes/MDR phenotypes and to gain a better understanding of Salmonella epidemiology. For this reason, we analyzed trends over a nine-year period in serotypes, and antimicrobial resistance, of Salmonella isolates recovered at the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (MVDL) from swine (n = 2,537) and cattle (n = 1,028) samples. Prevalence of predominant serotypes changed over time; in swine, S. Typhimurium and S. Derby decreased and S. Agona and S. 4,5,12:i:- increased throughout the study period. In cattle, S. Dublin, S. Montevideo and S. Cerro increased and S. Muenster became less frequent. Median minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates were higher for those recovered from swine compared with cattle, and were particularly high for certain antibiotic-serotype combinations. The proportion of resistant swine isolates was also higher than observed in the NARMS data, probably due to the different cohort of animals represented in each dataset. Results provide insight into the dynamics of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella in livestock in Minnesota, and can help to monitor emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance.

PMID:
27936204
PMCID:
PMC5148076
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0168016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

CA and PM are currently affiliated with Epi-interactive, but this affiliation however does not affect our declaration on conflict of interest, does not represent any competing interest with the results reported here and does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on data and material sharing.

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