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PLoS One. 2016 Dec 9;11(12):e0167629. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0167629. eCollection 2016.

Analysis of HIV Diversity in HIV-Infected Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (HPTN 061).

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
2
Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
3
Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
4
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
5
Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
6
Science Facilitation Department, FHI 360, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America.
7
Bridge HIV, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
8
Department of Family Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
9
Department of Global Health, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.
10
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milken Institute School of Public Health at The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America.
11
Department of Medicine, Harlem Hospital, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York, United States of America.
12
Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention, Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, New York, United States of America.
13
School of Social Welfare, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York, United States of America.
14
The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
15
Infectious Disease Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
16
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

HIV populations often diversify in response to selective pressures, such as the immune response and antiretroviral drug use. We analyzed HIV diversity in Black men who have sex with men who were enrolled in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 study.

METHODS:

A high resolution melting (HRM) diversity assay was used to measure diversity in six regions of the HIV genome: two in gag, one in pol, and three in env. HIV diversity was analyzed for 146 men who were HIV infected at study enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection (identified using a multi-assay algorithm), and for 21 men who seroconverted during the study. HIV diversification was analyzed in a paired analysis for 62 HIV-infected men using plasma samples from the enrollment and 12-month (end of study) visits.

RESULTS:

Men with acute or recent infection at enrollment and seroconverters had lower median HRM scores (lower HIV diversity) than men with non-recent infection in all six regions analyzed. In univariate analyses, younger age, higher CD4 cell count, and HIV drug resistance were associated with lower median HRM scores in multiple regions; ARV drug detection was marginally associated with lower diversity in the pol region. In multivariate analysis, acute or recent infection (all six regions) and HIV drug resistance (both gag regions) were associated with lower median HRM scores. Diversification in the pol region over 12 months was greater for men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load at study enrollment.

CONCLUSIONS:

HIV diversity was significantly associated with duration of HIV infection, and lower gag diversity was observed in men who had HIV drug resistance. HIV pol diversification was more pronounced in men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load.

PMID:
27936098
PMCID:
PMC5147928
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0167629
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist, with the following exceptions: Susan Eshleman has collaborated on research studies with investigators from Abbott Laboratories (distributor of the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System). Abbott Laboratories has provided reagents and performed testing for some collaborative studies. Susan Eshleman received an honorarium in 2009 for a presentation at a symposium sponsored by Abbott Laboratories. William Clarke receives research support from Thermo Fisher Scientific, including monetary support, instrument placement, and reagents. William Clarke also acts as a consultant for Thermo Fisher Scientific. This does not alter the authors' adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. Iris Chen contributed to this article in her personal capacity. The views expressed are her own and do not represent the views of the Health Resources and Services Administration or the United States Government.

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