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Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2016;64(3):319-331. doi: 10.3233/CH-168120.

Prefabrication and free transfer of a tissue engineered composite flap - An experimental model in the rat.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Germany.
2
Division of Microsurgery, Pius Branzeu Center for Laparoscopic Surgery and Microsurgery, Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.
3
Institute of Biomaterial Science and Berlin-Brandenburger Centre for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT), Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Teltow, Germany.
4
HNO Praxis im Zentrum, M√ľnchen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The technique of flap-prefabrication has been successfully established in tissue engineering: missing intrinsic vascularisation of engineered tissue can be generated in vivo by microsurgical vesselloop construction. It is possible to move engineered tissue into a defect with microsurgery. In the literature, the combination of engineered tissue covered with skin is not widely reported.

OBJECTIVE:

Aim of this study was to establish a model to investigate scaffold prefabrication with full thickness skin graft coverage with subsequent free tissue transfer.

METHODS:

8 Wistar rats were operated in 2 separate steps: 1) after creating an arteriovenous loop with the femoral vessels, a porous scaffold was placed on the loop and covered with an inguinally based skin flap. A control was implanted without loop into the contralateral groin. 2) 6 weeks later the prefabricated composite flaps were microsurgically transferred to the cervical region. Skin-island monitoring was performed with Laser Doppler-scanner after the transfer.

RESULTS:

Continuous loss of the skin islands was observed within 72 hours. Complications included wound-dehiscence, thrombosis and death from anaesthesia; in spite of consistent loop viability.

CONCLUSION:

Evaluation showed that modifications are necessary to maintain the skin-island cove.

KEYWORDS:

Composite tissue; angiogenesis and vasculogenesis; animal models; enabling technologies; fundamentals of tissue engineering; tissue engineering applications

PMID:
27935552
DOI:
10.3233/CH-168120
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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