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Ann Biomed Eng. 2017 Mar;45(3):525-541. doi: 10.1007/s10439-016-1762-8. Epub 2016 Dec 8.

SimVascular: An Open Source Pipeline for Cardiovascular Simulation.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
2
Open Source Medical Software Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA.
3
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
4
Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
6
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. shadden@berkeley.edu.
7
University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1740, USA. shadden@berkeley.edu.

Abstract

Patient-specific cardiovascular simulation has become a paradigm in cardiovascular research and is emerging as a powerful tool in basic, translational and clinical research. In this paper we discuss the recent development of a fully open-source SimVascular software package, which provides a complete pipeline from medical image data segmentation to patient-specific blood flow simulation and analysis. This package serves as a research tool for cardiovascular modeling and simulation, and has contributed to numerous advances in personalized medicine, surgical planning and medical device design. The SimVascular software has recently been refactored and expanded to enhance functionality, usability, efficiency and accuracy of image-based patient-specific modeling tools. Moreover, SimVascular previously required several licensed components that hindered new user adoption and code management and our recent developments have replaced these commercial components to create a fully open source pipeline. These developments foster advances in cardiovascular modeling research, increased collaboration, standardization of methods, and a growing developer community.

KEYWORDS:

Hemodynamics; Image-based CFD; Open-source; Patient-specific modeling

PMID:
27933407
PMCID:
PMC6546171
DOI:
10.1007/s10439-016-1762-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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