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Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis. 2017 Mar;1863(3):654-662. doi: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2016.12.001. Epub 2016 Dec 6.

A scavenger peptide prevents methylglyoxal induced pain in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: sebastian.brings@med.uni-heidelberg.de.
2
Department of Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München-Neuherberg, Germany.
3
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Department of Medicine II, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
5
Centre for Pediatrics and Adolescence Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
Department of Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
7
Department of Medicine I and Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), München-Neuherberg, Germany; Joint Heidelberg-IDC Translational Diabetes Program, Helmholtz-Zentrum, München-Neuherberg, Germany.

Abstract

The reactive metabolite methylglyoxal (MG) has been identified as mediator of pain. Scavenging of free MG and the prevention of MG-derived post-translational modifications may provide a useful therapeutic treatment. An arginine-rich, fatty acid coupled, cyclic peptide (CycK(Myr)R4E) with high proteolytic stability and prolonged circulation was developed for the scavenging of MG. It was shown to reduce the formation of albumin-MG adducts in vitro and prevented MG-induced pain by reducing plasma MG levels through the formation of peptide-MG adducts in vivo. CycK(Myr)R4E therefore presents a promising option for the treatment of pain and other diabetic complications associated with high MG levels.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetic complications; Methylglyoxal; Pain; Peptide; Scavenger

PMID:
27932057
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbadis.2016.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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