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Am J Prev Med. 2017 Feb;52(2):220-223. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.10.027. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Hookah Use Among Florida High School Students, 2011-2014.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Electronic address: tebarnett@phhp.ufl.edu.
2
Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
3
Social and Behavioral Sciences Program, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
4
Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention, Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, Florida.
5
Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida, Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, Florida.
6
Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Adolescent use of hookah continues to increase in the U.S., even in states that have reported decreases in traditional cigarette use among youth. Hookah use typically involves smoking a moistened, loose, sweetened tobacco product with charcoal as the heat source.

METHODS:

Data from the 2011-2014 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey were analyzed in 2016 to determine trends in the prevalence of lifetime hookah use (at least once in the adolescent's lifetime) and current hookah use (used in the past 30 days) among high school students (grades 9-12).

RESULTS:

In 2014, a total of 22.5% of Florida public high school students reported ever smoking a hookah, up from 18.2% in 2011. Current hookah use was reported by 11.6% of high school students, an increase from 8.0% in 2011. Female high school students had an increase in use whereas male students' prevalence was relatively stable. Hispanic and non-Hispanic black students reported significant increases over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

The increase in hookah use among adolescents needs continuous monitoring given the recent increase after relatively stable patterns. Efforts are needed to reduce the appeal and use of hookah by young people.

PMID:
27931794
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2016.10.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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