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Biol Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 15;81(12):1041-1049. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2016.10.018. Epub 2016 Oct 21.

Learning From One's Mistakes: A Dual Role for the Rostromedial Tegmental Nucleus in the Encoding and Expression of Punished Reward Seeking.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina. Electronic address: vento@musc.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
3
Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
4
Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Psychiatric disorders such as addiction and mania are marked by persistent reward seeking despite highly negative or aversive outcomes, but the neural mechanisms underlying this aberrant decision making are unknown. The recently identified rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) encodes a wide variety of aversive stimuli and sends robust inhibitory projections to midbrain dopamine neurons, leading to the hypothesis that the RMTg provides a brake to reward signaling in response to aversive costs.

METHODS:

To test the role of the RMTg in punished reward seeking, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were tested in several cost-benefit decision tasks after excitotoxic lesions of the RMTg or temporally specific optogenetic inhibition of RMTg efferents in the ventral tegmental area.

RESULTS:

RMTg lesions drastically impaired the ability of foot shock to suppress operant responding for food. Optogenetic inhibition showed that this resistance to punishment was due in part to RMTg activity at the precise moment of shock delivery and was mediated by projections to the ventral tegmental area, which is consistent with an aversive "teaching signal" role for the RMTg during encoding of the aversive event. We observed a similar resistance to punishment when the RMTg was selectively inhibited immediately prior to the operant lever press, which is consistent with a second distinct role for the RMTg during action selection. These effects were not attributable to RMTg effects on learning rate, locomotion, shock sensitivity, or perseveration.

CONCLUSIONS:

The RMTg has two strong and dissociable roles during both encoding and recall of aversive consequences of behavior.

KEYWORDS:

Aversion; Decision making; Punishment; Reward; Rostromedial tegmental nucleus

PMID:
27931744
PMCID:
PMC5400739
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2016.10.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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