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Dent Mater. 2017 Feb;33(2):166-174. doi: 10.1016/j.dental.2016.11.009. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Mesoporous silica fillers and resin composition effect on dental composites cytocompatibility.

Author information

1
Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Université Lyon1, Villeurbanne, France; UFR Odontologie, Université Lyon1, Service de Consultations et de Traitements Dentaires, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France. Electronic address: nina.attik@univ-lyon1.fr.
2
Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Université Lyon1, Villeurbanne, France.
3
Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Université Lyon1, Villeurbanne, France; UFR Odontologie, Université Lyon1, Service de Consultations et de Traitements Dentaires, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.
4
Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Université Lyon1, Villeurbanne, France; UFR D'odontologie, Université Paris Diderot, APHP, Hôpital Rothschild, Service d'Odontologie, Paris, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Many new dental composites containing mesoporous silica fillers have been developed to improve rheological properties and enhance the resin-filler interface. To investigate the correlation between the cytocompatibility of several dental composites and their composition; two aspects have been considered: presence of bisphenol A (BPA)-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) or triethyleneglycol-dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) among the resin monomers and presence of porous particles among the filler blends.

METHODS:

Five commercial composites with different resin matrices and mineral fillers were compared to four experimental composites designed without any BPA-based monomers or TEGDMA. Porous fillers, with or without silanation, were added in some of the experimental composites. Two reference resin matrices were also selected. Cytocompatibility with cultured primary human gingival fibroblasts was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy with time-lapse imaging. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to control monomer conversion rate.

RESULTS:

Conversion rates of the experimental composites ranged from 57% to 71%, a comparable ratio for dental composites. Experimental samples were better tolerated than tested commercial samples not containing TEGDMA and significantly better than those containing TEGDMA. Experimental composites with porous fillers exhibited good cytocompatibility, especially when surfaces were silanated.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Cytotoxicity was associated with resin amount and especially resin nature. Composites containing porous fillers might behave as if the resin trapped into pores has no effect on toxicity. The cytotoxicity of composites with and without BPA derivatives was mainly attributed to the release of residual TEGDMA rather than the BPA derivatives.

KEYWORDS:

Confocal microscopy; Conversion rate; Cytocompatibility; Dental composite; FTIR; Human gingival fibroblast; Porous fillers; Time lapse imaging

PMID:
27931721
DOI:
10.1016/j.dental.2016.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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