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J Sports Sci Med. 2016 Dec 1;15(4):704-714. eCollection 2016 Dec.

Effects of a High Protein and Omega-3-Enriched Diet with or Without Creatine Supplementation on Markers of Soreness and Inflammation During 5 Consecutive Days of High Volume Resistance Exercise in Females.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School, and Sport Sciences Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor , Belton, TX, USA.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School, and Sport Sciences Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Belton, TX, USA; Human Performance Laboratory, Exercise and Sport Sciences Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Belton, TX, USA.
3
Human Performance Laboratory, Exercise and Sport Sciences Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor , Belton, TX, USA.
4
Molecular and Applied Sciences Laboratory, School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA; Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine - Auburn Campus, Auburn, AL, USA.

Abstract

We examined if two different dietary interventions affected markers of soreness and inflammation over a 5-day high-volume resistance training protocol in females that resistance-trained 8 weeks prior. Twenty-eight females (age: 20 ± 1 yr; body mass: 63.5 ± 1.6 kg, height: 1.67 ± 0.01 m) completed 4 weeks of pre-training (weeks 1-4) followed by a subsequent 4-week training period along with a dietary intervention (weeks 5-8). Dietary interventions from weeks 5-8 included: a) no intervention (CTL, n = 10) b) a higher-protein diet supplemented with hydrolyzed whey protein (50 g/d) and omega-3 fatty acids (900 mg/d) (DI, n = 8), and c) the DI condition as well as creatine monohydrate (5 g/d) (DI+C, n = 10). During week 9, participants resistance-trained for five consecutive days whereby 8 sets of 10 target repetitions at 70% one repetition maximum (1RM) were performed each day for bench press, back squat, deadlift, and hip-thrusters with the intent of eliciting muscle soreness and inflammation. Prior to and 24 h following each of the 5 bouts muscle soreness (DOMS) was assessed via questionnaire, and fasting blood was obtained and analyzed for serum cortisol, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). No group*time (G*T) or time effects were observed for training volume over the 5-d overreaching protocol. Furthermore, no group*time (G*T) or time effects were observed for serum cortisol, IL-6 or CRP, and DOMS actually decreased in all groups 24 h following the fifth day training bout. This study demonstrates that, regardless of protein, omega-3 fatty acid and/or creatine supplementation, 5 days of consecutive resistance training does not alter perceived muscle soreness, training volume, and/or markers of inflammation in novice resistance-trained females.

KEYWORDS:

Whey protein; creatine monohydrate; inflammation; muscle soreness

PMID:
27928217
PMCID:
PMC5131225

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