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Clin Respir J. 2018 Feb;12(2):382-397. doi: 10.1111/crj.12588. Epub 2017 Jan 5.

Vitamin D deficiency: What does it mean for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)? a compherensive review for pulmonologists.

Author information

1
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, School of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey.
2
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asian Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
3
Department of Pulmonology, School of Medicine, Clinical Science Center, St George University, London, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Vitamin D deficiency and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are both under-recognized health problems, world-wide. Although Vitamin D has long been known for calcemic effects it also has less known noncalcemic effects. Recent data have shown that Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with COPD and correlates with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ) and FEV1 decline. The objective of this work was to review the current literature on vitamin D deficiency in relation with COPD.

DATA SOURCE:

A literature search, using the words "vitamin D" and "COPD", was undertaken in Pubmed database.

RESULTS:

The noncalcemic effects of vitamin D relating with COPD may be summarised as increasing antimicrobial peptide production, regulation of inflammatory response and airway remodelling. Vitamin D inhibits the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and leads to suppression Th1 and Th17 responses which may be involved in the pathogenesis of COPD. Vitamin D insufficiency may also contribute to chronic respiratory infections and airway colonization so returning vitamin D concentrations to an optimal range in patients with COPD might reduce bacterial load and concomitant exacerbations.Vitamin D is also important for COPD-related comorbodities such as osteoporosis, muscle weakness and cardiovascular diseases. Data about the effect of Vitamin D supplementation on those comorbidities in relation with COPD are been scarce.

CONCLUSION:

Improving the blood level of Vitamin D into the desired range may have a beneficial effect bones and muscles, but more studies are needed to test to test that hypothesis.

KEYWORDS:

COPD; prevention and treatment; vitamin D; vitamin D deficiency

PMID:
27925404
DOI:
10.1111/crj.12588
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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